Category Archives: Latest News

Categories Latest News

Training Solutions NI Attend 40 years Of NEBOSH Event At Titanic

 

Last week members of our Training Solutions N.I. team attended a reception at the Titanic Quarter to mark the 40th Anniversary of Nebosh.

The event provided the opportunity for Nebosh’s Chief Executive Ian Taylor to talk about the upcoming changes and the direction Nebosh is going in.

 

Over the past year Ian has travelled to different parts of the globe such as Kuwait to gain insight into the constantly evolving Health and Safety industry. He also noted that in some cases, one company in particular will not let any of its employees on site unless they have a Nebosh qualification.

Furthermore, Nebosh are in the process of developing virtual reality software for new courses which will modernise the way of learning by providing scenarios which employees may face on the job. One example of this is where the virtual reality headset will give a video of workplace hazards which the student will have to identify.

Training Solutions NI was one of the first learning partners to be awarded Gold Status which means that we are considered one of the premier providers in the UK. As a result of this we will continue to be at the forefront in delivering Nebosh training to the highest quality.

Jim Stewart CBE, our Managing Director noted that the “customer is key at Training Solutions NI and we take great pride in trying to achieve excellence through ensuring we have the best trainers, best facilities and the best support for our delegates”

Our trainers are all absolute experts in their fields who have years of experience from being former HSE Principal Inspectors, Senior Fire Instructors and Chartered members of IOSH.

On behalf of all of our Training Solutions NI team we would like to thank Nebosh for their invitation to the event and we look forward to continually working you in the future.

Categories Latest News

Focus on DSE Safety – staying fit and well for life is a great incentive

Focus on safety for use of DSE

Can working with Display Screen Equipment (DSE’s) lead to physical and mental health harm? 

The short answer is YES!!

(According to HSE statistics, in 2017/18, 469,000 workers suffered from work-related musculoskeletal  and work related upper limb disorders)!

Can we reduce the risk so far as is reasonably practicable?

Absolutely Yes!

Working with display screen equipment is not a high-risk occupation, however it does expose users to potential harm and as such there is a legal duty on employers to put in place controls to reduce the risk so far as is reasonably practicable.  Display screen equipment (DSE) Assessments are a legal requirement and the good news is that if they are done correctly, they can help with combating musculoskeletal disorders and other ill-health effects that DSE users are at risk of developing through time spent at a poorly designed workstation.

The Health and Safety at Work (NI) Order 1978 places a legal duty on employers ‘to ensure the health, safety and welfare of all of his/her employees, so far as is reasonably practicable’.  But it is not all down to the employer!  Employees have a legal duty to ‘take reasonable care of their own health and safety and that of anyone who could be affected by their acts or omissions’.  The Management of Health and Safety at Work (NI) Regulations 2000 places a legal duty on employers to identify reasonably foreseeable risks and to reduce those risks so far as is reasonably practicable.  These risk assessments must be written down if there are five or more employees. And as we mentioned before; employees have to legal duty to help their employer to meet these legal requirements.

There is specific legislation regarding the use of DSE’s ‘The DSE at Work Regulations 1992’.  A user is defined as ‘one who works for more than an hour at a time on Display Screen Equipment’.  The Regulations do not apply to workers who use DSE infrequently or only for a short time.

The Regulations state that employers must;

  • Carry out a DSE Assessment
  • Reduce risks including making sure workers take frequent breaks from DSE work or do something different.
  • Provide an eye test if a worker asks for one.
  • Provide information, instruction and training – including refresher.

Many years ago, before the age of word processors, personal computers, laptops, tablets and smart phones many would argue that the workplace was a less stressful environment and it was certainly less sedentary.  Typing on a manual typewriter was taught as part of secondary school education and that teaching included how to assume the right posture to enable a person to sit for hours typing away.  Office workers had to get up from their desk to file documents and thus change their posture and stretch their legs, rather than file and save. This gave the users an opportunity to correct their posture and vary their work tasks.  Of course, there are many hazards associated with working on typewriters, traditional or digital, and we can do a lot to reduce the risk of harm!  Fit and well for life, how does that sound?

Many workers are sitting for hours typing on computers and that practice can have serious repercussions for our health and wellbeing.  Conditions associated with working on DSE include ‘work related upper limb disorders’ eye strain, repetitive strain injury and carpal tunnel problems.  There is also a high risk that users of DSE’s could suffer from the harmful effects of stress which could result in physical or mental disorders.  There are many scholarly articles associating the sedentary nature of computer use with the increase in obesity worldwide.

Provision of good quality information, instruction, training and supervision will reduce the likelihood of DSE related harm occurring.

See below an outline of what needs to be covered in a DSE Safety training course;

  • Definition of a DSE User
  • Types of DSE
  • Employers and employees’ responsibilities
  • An overview of relevant legislation
  • Potential ill-health effects
  • Assuming the right posture
  • Adjusting seating
  • Rotating administration tasks
  • Ergonomics
  • Environmental factors
  • Practical Assessments
  • Implementation
  • Positive lifestyle choices that may reduce the potential consequence of constant use of DSE’s
  • Discussion and critique

Conclusion

Working with display screen equipment does expose users to potential ill-health.  The law puts in place boundaries where employers have a legal duty to reduce the risk (so far as is reasonably practicable), and employees’ duty is to help their employer meet those requirements.  Completion of mandatory DSE assessments and providing comprehensive training and supervision will go a long way to reduce the likelihood of harm.  Individuals can take positive steps to reduce the potential consequence.   Let’s start with focusing on adjusting your chair.

How to adjust your chair 

Height – lever under the seat on the right with up and down arrows.

Set the chair height so that the underside of your elbows are at desk level

Feet – ensure they are placed firmly on the floor.

Sit well back in your chair and make sure your feet are firmly on the floor.

Adjust the chair angle – lever on the right side at the back of your chair

Sitting with the seat horizontal or sloping backwards provides a comfortable, relaxing sitting position while maintaining good posture.  It can nevertheless tilt you slightly away from your desk.  Sitting on a slight angle in a forward position towards the desk relieves pressure under the thighs and provides a more open hip angle and improves back posture.

Adjust the back rest angle – lever on the right, showing backward and forward arrows

When working on an ergonomic workstation a fairly upright sitting position is best.

When talking, at meetings or reading off the screen, reclining the backrest is relaxing and provides a nice change for the back.

Adjust the backrest height – The backrest height adjustments are all different.

A comfortable computer chair has well-shaped backrest cushioning. The most protruding part of this should fit into the lower back around waist level.

You may need to loosen a lever or knob at the base of the backrest. (if there is no knob or lever you must have a rachet style adjustment)

Look out for our next ‘focus on you’ subject; ‘Choosing positive lifestyle choices to potentially reduce the harmful effects of stress’

In the meantime, stay safe!

 

Categories Latest News

Proud to be part of Nebosh Learner Partner Programme – Gold status

It is a privilege to be accredited to deliver NEBOSH Qualifications and we take great pride in providing the highest quality training at Training Solutions (NI) Ltd.  NEBOSH has just launched their Learner Partner Programme and have contacted us today to confirm that we have obtained Gold Status!  Thank you so much NEBOSH!

You might ask, what does it take to be awarded Gold Status?

  • We need to ensure all learners understand what is expected of them and what they can expect from us as their learning provider.
  • We need to create a learning environment that is engaging and encourages interaction that is appropriate for the course and type of delivery
  • We need to provide accurate course materials and continually update and improve them.
  • We need to ensure tutors are qualified, knowledgeable, competent and engaging.
  • We need to provide our learners with feedback on their progress and provide appropriate support.
  • We need to review course delivery and learner feedback and action as necessary.

At Training Solutions (NI) Ltd., we consider our clients to be of the utmost importance.  It is our aim to provide them with the best learning experience possible, never to compromise on quality and to continually grow and improve.  If you haven’t had the Training Solutions experience, perhaps you will in the future.

We would love to hear from you!

Keep safe.

Nicola

Categories Latest News

Let’s talk risk assessment!

The Health and Safety Executive Guidance Document HSG65 applies the ‘Plan, Do, Check and Act’ approach to the management of occupational Health and Safety.  Risk assessment is the second step so, let’s take this step by step as per the guidance;

  • Plan – determining policy and planning for implementation
  • Do – Profile risks/Organise for health and safety and implement your plan.
  • Check – Measure performance – proactively and re-actively
  • Act – Review performance and act on lessons learned.

A risk assessment is a careful examination of anything in your workplace that could cause harm or ill-health.  The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 places a legal duty on employers to carry out suitable and sufficient risks assessments of reasonably foreseeable risks and to put in place controls to reduce the risk ‘so far as is reasonably practicable’  If the organisation has five or more employees the law dictates that risk assessments are written down, communicated to workforce and others who could be affected and that they are regularly reviewed.

Risk assessments do not need to be complicated, in fact they should be straightforward and easily understood by everyone.  And, everyone should be involved in the risk assessment process.  You might think you know the hazards associated with certain activities in your workplace, but the person who actually does the job may have a more comprehensive understanding and could highlight a hazard that might otherwise be overlooked.

So how are risk assessments carried out?  Quite simply, the HSE advise we use the five steps to risk assessment;

  • Identify the hazards
  • Estimate the risk
  • Evaluate the risk
  • Record your findings
  • Review your risk assessment regularly

Provision of information, instruction and training is mandatory for employers.  If your workforce fully understand the risk assessment process and have ownership through contributing their knowledge and experience to the process, then this can go a long way to improving the health and safety culture of your organisation.

The HSE defines what health and safety culture is; ‘The safety culture of an organisation is the product of individual and group values, attitudes, perceptions, competencies and patterns of behaviour that determine the commitment to, and the style and proficiency of, an organisation’s health and safety management.  Organisation with a positive safety culture are characterised by communications founded on mutual trust, by shared perceptions of the importance of safety and by confidence in the efficacy of preventive measures’

We at Training Solutions (NI) Ltd are passionate about health and safety.  We aim to play our role in delivering courses that really benefit the client and attendees and ultimately make the workplace a safer place.  If you would like us to educate and motivate your team to play their part in the risk assessment process, we will tailor a course to be relevant to your working environment, interactive and practical and enjoyable.  Staying safe and healthy for life – what could be better?

Search our site for suggested course content and see if we can help make your workplace safer?

 

 

Categories Latest News

CSR is changing – here is what the CEF say…..

New Craft & Supervisor CSR Cards Require NVQ qualification from September 2019

From 1 September 2019 the Construction Skills Register (CSR) will remove all remaining occupational assessments, including supervisors. From this date all new blue and gold card applicants will be required to hold an NVQ Level 2 qualification (or higher) relevant to the card holder’s occupation. Health and safety training will continue to be required.

PLEASE NOTE THIS DOES NOT IMPACT RENEWALS. Current blue and gold card holders can continue to renew their cards by completing the relevant health and safety training upon expiry of their current card.

This new requirement continues the previously announced significant changes to CSR in 2019. The changes are being introduced to ensure CSR continues to meet the needs of the Northern Ireland construction industry and to enable continued mobility and acceptance of CSR cards throughout the UK, through compliance with the Construction Leadership Council’s (CLCs) One Industry Logo requirements.

 

Categories Latest News

We are an approved Enhanced Learning Credit (ELC) Training Provider

We are delighted to confirm that we are an Enhanced Learning Credit Approved Training Provider. (ELC)  For those for which this is applicable, perhaps you would be interested in receiving information on courses we can offer you e.g.

You may be interested in our City and Guilds electrical courses as below;

2382-18 – 18th Edition training 

2391-52 – Inspection and Testing combination course

2377-22 – Portable Appliance Testing  

You also may be interested in our NEBOSH courses as below;

NEBOSH National General Certificate in Occupational Health and Safety

NEBOSH National Certificate in Fire Safety and Risk Management

NEBOSH National Certificate in Construction Health and Safety

NEBOSH National Certificate in the Management of Health and Well-being at Work

NEBOSH Certificate in Environmental Management

Nebosh National Diploma in Occupational Health and Safety – Level 6

For further information on any of these courses please tour our site or give us a call.

Categories Latest News

City & Guilds PAT 2377-22 – for those with the qualification who would like an additional one day practical course

Many people from a host of occupations find themselves on the City and Guilds PAT course because their company opt to PAT test in-house.  For candidates from electrical backgrounds this course is common place and the practical elements of carrying out the tasks is routine.  However, for those candidates with no electrical background many have asked if we would provide an additional solely practical one day course.

We at Training Solutions (NI) Ltd always stretch to meet our clients’ needs and requirements.  If you would benefit from a one day ‘Practical PAT testing’ course, register your interest by emailing us at info@trainingsolutionsni.co.uk

 

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